HIV and AIDS in 2030: A Choice Between Two Futures
HIV and AIDS in 2030: A Choice Between Two Futures

The Book

HIV and AIDS in 2030: A Choice Between Two Futures

Foreword by Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH, Author, The End of Epidemics

This is a book written by David Barstow that tells the story about the future of HIV and AIDS. In fact, it is a story about two very different futures; one in which HIV and AIDS have made a strong resurgence during the 2020’s, and one in which HIV and AIDS have been eliminated as threats to public health by 2030.

2030 will be a year of reckoning for the AIDS epidemic, marking fifty years of one of the worst epidemics in the history of the world. The 28th International AIDS Conference will be held in July of that year in Durban, South Africa. The conference will include a panel of leaders looking back on the fifty-year history of HIV and AIDS. But what will the panelists say?

If HIV and AIDS have made a strong resurgence in the 2020s, the panel will be called How We Lost the War Against AIDS, and the panelists will focus on the mistakes that led to a tragic humanitarian failure.

But in a different future, a future in which HIV and AIDS are no longer threats to public health, the panel will be called How We Won the War Against AIDS, and the panelists will celebrate the wise decisions that led to a remarkable humanitarian triumph. Which future will we see?

Now is the time to choose.


 
 

Reviews

Barstow’s message is both startling and clear: we must act now.
— PROFESSOR PETER PIOT – Director, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Founding Executive Director, UNAIDS
David Barstow’s book lays out two possible storylines based on the two possible choices the world might make. We can write this next chapter, but what will we write? The choice is ours to make.
— RICHARD STEARNS – President Emeritus, World Vision US

The HIV response has been one of the most successful in the history of public health. If we act now, we can get to the end. If we do not, history will not treat current policy makers well.
— AMB. MARK DYBUL – Co-Director, Center for Global Health and Quality, Professor of Medicine, Georgetown University and former Executive Director, The Global Fund
We’ve made a commitment to bringing HIV and AIDS under control by 2030, and we know how. Not to do so is a policy choice—and a policy failure—with tragic consequences.
— AMB. JIMMY KOLKER – Former Chief of HIV/AIDS Section, UNICEF
We must return to the sense of urgency and recharge our efforts. Barstow makes it clear the heavy price the world will pay for not doing so.
— DR. MICHAEL MERSON – Author, The AIDS Pandemic: Searching for a Global Response and Professor of Global Health, Duke University
David Barstow deftly combines the meticulous attention to order and detail that you would expect from a
scientist with the persistence and passion for action you would expect from an activist.
— DR. JONATHAN D. QUICK – Author, The End of Epidemics and Adjunct Professor of Global Health, Duke Global Health Institute